SEE with Words: March 17, 2015

5 Reasons to Self-Publish:

Commercial publishers don’t have the time or resources to read all of the manuscripts submitted, upwards of 150,000 titles per year.  They are looking for name recognition or authors who come with certain sales potential and definite outlets.

Within recent years, self-publishing has become one of the fastest growing segments of the publishing industry.  Some of the best authors may not initially be published by a major publishing house, but after the book is printed and marketed in published form, and the author establishes a track record in sales, that book may be picked up by a major publishing house for an attractive contract.

Two such success stories are:

Laurie Notaro’s The Idiot Girls’ Action Adventure Club was originally published by iUniverse, then placed twelfth on the New York Times Paperback Best-Seller List which landed her a six-figure, two-book contract with Random House.

Steven Keslowitz’s The Simpsons and Society was first published by Wheatmark before the book was published by Sourcebooks.

So here are the 5 reasons you may want to consider self-publishing:

  1. Keep control of your project;
  2. Control the time frame for writing, editing, and publishing;
  3. Fill a specific niche;
  4. Be the sole owner of the proceeds from the book’s sales;
  5. Get yourself in print.

Check Amazon.com for books published by Eileen Birin.

SEE with WORDS: February 18, 2015

RULES:

  • There are no firm or important rules for good writing.
  • However, know them first before you break them.
  • Follow writing guidelines; they free you to do what works best for you.

Rules are structures that set limits; true artists transcend to heights unlimited; great art has no borders.  But here’s the catch: in order to soar, one needs a solid structure as the launching pad.

Remember those language arts teachers who insisted we bring our journals to class everyday.  And then usually before an English composition lesson, we would spend five minutes writing anything that popped into our heads.  Forget spelling, grammar, sentence structure, just write, write, write.  We were encouraged to free write, to brainstorm all those creative ideas that later would become our coveted “A” English composition papers.  No one would ever see these first draft scribblings of ours, but we knew we could never hand-in anything we wrote in our notebooks until we “fixed” it up and made it better for a passing grade.

So too, true artists have learned, practiced and mastered the rules first which then sets them free to soar into their unique creative worlds.  Imagine this: what if your novel, story or poem resembled the free writing of your school day journal.  How distracting would that be to readers?  If the reader doesn’t understand what you’re trying to say, if your lack of writing efficiently interferes with the story line, how long will you hold that reader’s attention?  Know the rules first before you break them.

That said; let’s explore some useful writing guidelines that have proven successful in a writer’s creative journey.

Materials you may need for your journey:

1.  Notebooks:

You’ll need several handy notebooks, whatever fits into your pocket, purse, briefcase, and glove compartment – use whatever works best for you.  Once you start writing your novel, you will be amazed at how many new ideas begin popping into mind any time of the day and night.  You’ll want to jot down that good idea, or clever quip before it is lost once again.  Good places to keep notebooks are:

ü      bedside table

ü      bathroom

ü      kitchen

ü      den or TV room

ü      car

ü      pocket or purse

ü      outside garden or patio

2.  Tape recorder:

Some of you may prefer to use small tape recorders instead of notebooks.  Recorders work best in cars, especially if you’re driving and that tinge of recollection arises, you’ll want to grab that recorder, click the on-button, and talk your heart out.

Recorders also work well on bedside tables.  In no time, you will train yourself to hit the on-button in the dark and talk softly into the recorder without even waking your partner.

3.  Several more important items to have close at hand:

ü      a comprehensive dictionary

ü      an authoritative thesaurus

ü      an English grammar handbook

ü      plenty of pens or well-sharpened pencils

ü      computer or word processor

Where do you go from here?

Writing is a craft. Writers write. Writers write every day; that’s their job.  By cultivating the habit of writing regularly, it will make the process easier and more enjoyable. Study the craft; exercise the craft by doing it everyday.

Check out Amazon.com for: Excuse My Dust, ten quick steps for writing success; and Come Sit a Spell, Recalling and Writing Memoirs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEE with WORDS: February 2, 2015

Considering Self-Publishing?  Meet the Masters:

The advent of independent publishing is not a recent development.  It has always been an American enterprise.  In 1776 Thomas Paine published Common Sense, Ben Franklin even used his own printing press. Walt Whitman published his controversial Leaves of Grass and even wrote the reviews for his own works; Carl Sandburg worked the presses and hand-bound his books of poetry.  Upton Sinclair refused to change the content of The Jungle and elicited the support of several friends to help publish the book before Doubleday offered to publish it.  In fact, both editions were printed simultaneously.

The list of masters include: Samuel Clemens, Zane Grey, Washington Irving, Stephen Crane, Edgar Allen Poe, Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf and others. f

Books originally self-published: Chicken Soup for the Soul, What Color is Your Parachute? The Celestine Prophecy, which Richard Redfield sold from the trunk of his car, Invisible Life, One Minute Manager, The Christmas Box.

And here are a few self-publishing services success stories: The Idiot Girls’ Action Adventure Club by Laurie Notaro, orginally published with iUniverse, #12 on the New York Times Paperback Best-Seller List, landed her a six-figure, two-book deal with Random House; and, The Simpsons and Society by Steven Keslowitz, orginally published with Wheatmark and then picked up by Sourcebooks.

The list goes on.  So Let’s Get Published!

Check out Excuse My Dust, ten quick steps for writing success, ebook available from Amazon.com

SEE with WORDS: January 26, 2015

What makes a WRITER tick!

Part of the majesty of being a writer is that we don’t fully understand what makes us tick, and if we did, we would lose the edge of our creativity.             –Tom-

Writing is like creating a movie; I’m the author, the producer, the director, and I get to play all the roles, be all the characters.                                   -Mabel-

I get thoughts and inspirations that won’t leave until I write them down.                                            -Val-

Writing is very therapeutic as well as relaxing and fun.             -Sandy-

I write to share what I learn.                     –Marty-

My mind is filled with ideas and they need to see themselves on paper before they disappear in a poof of smoke.                                                  –Linda-

I write because the characters make me!  They won’t let me off the hook.                                 –Zanne-

Writing validates my existence; it feeds my soul.            -Nancy-

I write for the same reason I read – to connect with a greater truth, a deeper feeling.  It helps me find my footing in the universe.                           –Marilyn-

My research over the years has unearthed thousands of stories that need to be told and preserved for posterity.  It is satisfying to share with others and know that the stories will not die.              –Emily-

A writing career gives you the opportunity to help other people – whether that means informing, entertaining or inspiring them.   I feel honored when readers tell me they enjoyed my book.        –Brian-

I write so I can be alone.         –Julie-

When I was 58 or 59 years old, I found out I had suppressed the desire to write all my life.  My friends haunted me until I wrote my first book.  Now I find writing so rewarding I can’t stop.                 –Mike-

I am a disable veteran who finds writing puts me into another world in which time and pain passes me by.                                                               -Sheila-

What can I say, I’m a writing junkie – hooked on ideas and words and other such creative stuff.      –Eileen-

 

 

 

Invoking your guardian angel

If you had a guardian angel, what form would your angel take (human or not)?  On what dilemma in your life right now would you most like guidance?

A-HA Moments

A few weeks ago I posted a Call for Submissions – scroll down to read the Call – now I’m adding a few requested details.  These submissions are to be A-Ha moments – a moment of truth, a turning point, breakthrough experiences – these A-Ha moments made an impression on you or expanded self knowledge.  I am looking for essays around 750 words, and the first deadline is Friday, September 6, 2013.  Contact neeliepubl@aol.com for more info.  -thank you-

Call for Submissions

Call for Submissions: 

Neelie Publishing is looking for submissions for a book project tentatively titled Reflections: Stories that Celebrate Life.  A reflection is not necessarily connected to any singular memory, but rather it is more a sense of well being, a moment of truth, or expanded self knowledge.  Reflect on the following – which ones have you experienced: 

  • an amazing event or miraculous happening;
  • an awakening of self understanding;
  • a change of attitude;
  • the meaning of life;
  • understanding death;
  • an unexplainable incident;
  • a profound feeling of recognition;
  • a turning point;
  • an unforgettable impression;
  • special gifts of understanding and wisdom;
  • the gifts of grace and love,
  • an unsolved mystery;
  • More: proudest moments; embarrassing moments; humorous times.

The beauties of nature often help reveal these special moments of self and understanding to us – an early morning walk, a sunrise or sunset, spending time in a rustic mountain cabin, along with ordinary life experiences like falling in love, fear divorce, illness, depression, or death.  It can be a solitary experience or one you went through with a group; come to you suddenly or over a span of years.  The important factor is that you are in a better state of mind and body today, and have a greater sense of respect and appreciation for yourself and others because you have experienced this single moment of truth and self-knowing.  This may be a difficult piece to write because it will require deep soul searching and may even reveal a part of you that you never knew existed

Spend time reflecting – permit this special moment to come to you, it may even take the form of a poem, and that’s okay.  The mysteries of life are often found in poems.  Don’t expect too much at first, but as you sit quietly and reflect that sense of well being will arrive, and you may be surprised at what you discover about yourself.

Reflect on that single moment– then write from your heart and senses, from your feelings, inner-self, and visions.

If interested:

Contact Neelie Publishing for more directives: neeliepubl@aol.com

Your Life a Book

Imagine your life is now a book.  In 100 words, write the blurb for it, what people will read on the back cover.

Last sentence – new story

Select a book from a random shelf in your home library.  Copy down the last sentence, and use this line to begin a short story.

What’s in a Word

Use the following words in your story or poem: little boy, torn page, market, cart.

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