Got an urge to write?  It’s not that hard – get started! 

So you always wanted to write.  Seriously.  Maybe it was a story you read, a movie or TV show you saw that perked your interest and caused you to say, “I can write like that.”  Or maybe you have something you want to say, ideas you have been wrestling with, memoirs to leave your loved ones, a story or poem that’s struggling within you to be put on paper.  Whatever the reason, you wouldn’t be reading this if you weren’t interested in writing.

But writing is hard work and too many wannabes fall by the wayside while sitting and waiting for the right opportunity or that epic idea that will set them on fire.

If you’re serious about pursuing the craft of writing, for pleasure or profit, then the first thing to do is get started.

Think of writing as you would any job.  You must show up, be on time, produce and enjoy what you are doing if you want to reap any rewards.

For starters keep a journal.  Professional writers have files or notebooks filled with notes, bits of conversations, cartoons, observations, newspaper clippings, photos, doodles.  They collect like crazy anything and everything.  Who knows what poem, story or article is lurking among those scraps of paper.

Ideas abound all around us.  Collect whatever you see and hear: a neighbor’s fading smile or the shoes on his feet; family stories or hiking White Tank Mountain Park; xeriscape gardening or an early morning Arizona sun rise.  Whatever you have observed describe in your journal or tape recorder.  Writers are keen observers, the more you develop this aspect, the more ideas will come to you.  Include in your journal your dreams and imaginings.  Imagination is the stuff creative writing is made of.

The next important step is to set up a routine.  Writers write every day; that’s their job.  Cultivating the essential habit of writing regularly will make writing easier and fun.

When to write and where to write will depend on your life style.  Try writing at different times: early morning, high noon, far into the night.  Once you’ve found your writing time, stick with it.  Serious writers would never think of doing dishes, the laundry, shopping, playing golf, answering the phone during their writing time.

It is also necessary to find a place where you feel comfortable at writing: your room or office, the kitchen table, soaking in a tub, lying on a couch.  Hemingway wrote standing at a lectern; Capote stretched out on a couch or in a hammock.  Some writers use tricks to get them in their writing mode like listening to music or the outside sounds of nature.  Whatever works.

Read more in Excuse My Dust, ten quick steps for writing success, available on Amazon.com